Release: Whence We Came (Return to the Otherworld 4)

Already halfway done. It feels like time’s just flying by, even in the Otherworld.

In the face of a greater danger, lesser arguments are left behind. When disaster strikes, old enmity is forgotten. Nowhere is that more true than in the other world.

The flood continues, submerging the lands of what some may have believed to be their corner of paradise. The secrets of the distant past remain buried, but they are slowly coming to light. And one member of the second expedition chooses a different path, a path that will test her faith in not only the divine, but also herself.

This one’s pretty much a direct continuation of Waters Rising, which shouldn’t be too out of the blue. It’s a nice little arc, mostly self-contained, but I threw in the added wrinkle of a “guest” chapter on Earth. Because our team has been gone a few weeks now, and they left behind some unfinished business.

Otherworld stories, remember, are available exclusively on my Patreon, so head on over that way to pick this one up. While you’re there, make sure to check out all the other great works you can get for the miniscule pledge of only $3/month. And get ready for Falling Into Place, which is only six weeks away. It’s a perfect choice for your Summer Reading List challenge.

Keep reading!

🖼🗣: the emoji conlang, part 7

Welcome to another chapter in the story of the emoji conlang 🖼🗣. This time around, we’ll get most of the more complex clauses you’d find in a language, including some that are traditionally considered the hardest to pin down. So let’s get right into it, shall we?

Comparisons

Comparing two things is both easy and common. In English, of course, you use “comparative” forms of adjectives: bigger, stronger, more interesting. 🖼🗣 does things a little differently, however.

First off, there are no special adjective suffixes for comparisons. That fits with the general idea of the conlang as being very isolating. Instead, we use the verb ⬜▫. Normally, it has the meaning “to exceed”, but we can prefix it with an adjective (effectively functioning as an adverb) to create a comparison: 👇 👨 ↕〰 ⬜▫ 👆 👩 “this man is taller than that woman”.

The form, then, is fairly simple. First comes the thing that is being compared. Next is an adjective for the quality being compared. Third on the list is the verb ⬜▫ (which can take suffixes if needed). Last comes the “standard”, the yardstick being measured against.

Note that this construction is for actual comparisons only. If you just want an adjective meaning “more of X”, you can just use the superlative suffix ⬛. It works for English “more” and “most”.

Causation and purpose

In 🖼🗣, these two concepts are closely related. Something can cause something else to perform an action, or something can perform that action for a reason. Either way, the form is similar, so we’ll treat these two types of clauses together.

First, the simpler purpose clause is just a string of verbs or verb phrases, with objects and the like inserted where they would normally go. So “I went to the store to buy food” becomes 🤳 🛫◀ 🏬 🛍📨 🥘.

Note here that the subject of the second clause is implied. That’s normal. Just having multiple verbs strung together is enough to indicate what we’re talking about. But we can add a subject, too: 🤳 🛫◀ 🏬 🤲 💁 👉▶ 🥘. (That strange 💁 in there will make sense in a minute.) Roughly, this sentence translates as “I went to the store so we’ll have food.”

Now, building off this, we can use the verb ↘ “cause” to create, well, causatives. For instance, ♀ ↘◀ 🤳 🛫 🏬 would mean something like “she made me go to the store”; here, we explicitly indicate the subject in the second clause, showing that it is not the same as in the first.

Finally, two special words work with the purpose clause to add to it. Between the verb phrases, we can add ⤵⌛: or ⤵↘ to express times or reasons, respectively. Here’s an example of each:

  • 🤳 ❔➡ 🚫 🛫◀ 🏫 ⤵⌛ ➡ 🤢. “I couldn’t go to school while I was sick.”
  • 🤳 ❔➡ 🚫 🛫◀ 🏫 ⤵↘ ➡ 🤢. “I couldn’t go to school because I was sick.”

The topic particle

I promised I’d explain 💁, so here goes. In linguistic terms, it’s a topic particle, sometimes called a topicalizer. If you know Japanese, it should feel familiar, as it functions much like the particle wa (は). If not, read on.

The topic of a sentence is often the same as the subject. In cases where it isn’t, however, or when we want to emphasize it for some reason, we use the topic particle to draw attention to it. Notably, 🖼🗣 uses this in possessive predicates. The formula here is (owner) 💁 ➡ (possession), and we could translate it loosely “with (owner), there is a (possession)”. Complicated, I know, but you’ll get the hang of it.

Indeed, possessives like this are one of the few cases where the language gives two similar concepts wildly different forms. Compare 🤳 💁 ➡ 🐈 “I have a cat” versus 🤳’🐈 “my cat”. Not nearly the same.

Back to the topic particle, though, because it’s got another use: subjects. Not the grammatical sort, but the discussion sort. If I wanted to say in 🖼🗣 that my favorite food is chicken, for instance, I might type 🥘 💁 🤳 🔘👍 🐔. You can follow the same pattern to express preferences, opinions, ideas, and much more.

Relative clauses

Last, we’ll look at what is traditionally considered one of the most difficult phrases to describe, the relative clause. Fortunately for us, 🖼🗣 makes those fairly easy to start.

Relative clauses always begin with 👈, so if you see that, you know what you’re dealing with. In some cases, you don’t even have to worry about anything else. When the head noun is the same as the subject of the relative clause, you’re done: 👩 👈 🏡➡ 📍 👵 ⬜▫ 🤳, “the woman who lives here is older than me”.

When it’s not the subject, the only thing that changes is an extra pronoun that we add into the relative clause, kind of a placeholder for what we took out. 👨 👈 🤳 👀◀ ♂ means “the man that I saw”, but a more literal translation would be the grammatically incorrect (in English) “the man that I saw him”. If you’ve ever lost yourself in relative clauses, you’ll recognize this one!

That extra pronoun functions exactly as the noun it’s replacing, even in possessive constructions. And pedants will either love or hate the way 🖼🗣 deals with relative nouns in prepositional phrases. Because of this “placeholder”, we have no reason to end a sentence with a preposition: 👇 👈 🤳 ➡ ⬅⬅ ◻ “this is where I’m from” (or, if you must be formal, “this is the place from where I come”).

Conclusion

That’s all for now, but we really have all that we need. Well, except for words. Those are, after all, the meat of a language, so the next part of the series is going to go back to making them. Keep watching, because it’s about to get even more fun!

Summer Reading List 2019

It’s that time of year again. Hard to believe it’s been twelve months already, but here we are. Memorial Day, at least for those of us in the United States. And that means it’s time for the 4th iteration of my Summer Reading List Challenge!

As with the last three, the whole thing is all for fun. Don’t worry too much about it. Think of it as a chance to try something new, or to clear out that growing stack of books (or files, if that’s how you roll).

The rules, which are really more recommendations than rules, are as follows:

  1. The goal is to read 3 new books between the US holidays of Memorial Day (May 27) and Labor Day (September 3). These are the “unofficial” beginning and end of summer, respectively. (Obviously, if you’re south of the equator, this is a winter reading list!)

  2. Books are loosely defined as any non-periodical work. Comics don’t work, nor do individual chapters of manga. Pretty much everything else is fair game, though. The important thing is that you’re honest with yourself.

  3. At least 1 book should be of a genre or subject you don’t normally read. (In the past, I’ve used a rule that you should have 1 nonfiction book, but I’m shaking things up this time around.) So, if you’re a big fantasy reader like me, try sci-fi or something like that. Or nonfiction. Nothing wrong with that.

  4. Anything you wrote doesn’t count. That makes sense, because they wouldn’t be new to you. And if I didn’t have this rule, I’d only read my own stuff.

That’s all there is to it. You can track my progress on my Patreon or my blog, Prose Poetry Code. For you social types, use the hashtag #SummerReading to spread the word. And you can follow me on the fediverse, now at a new address: @mikey@letsalllovela.in.

However you do it, have a great summer, and remember to keep reading!

Release: Waters Rising (Return to the Otherworld 3)

Here we go with another Otherworld story, Waters Rising:

In either world, the forces of nature are far beyond the power of a single person to deflect. Here in the other world, where life is already fragile beyond any experience of the second expedition, danger comes even from the skies above.

While some choose to delve into the ruins surrounding their point of arrival, others must fight a true disaster, a flood that threatens not only the scientific endeavors they seek here, but also the homes, the health, the lives of those they have come to love. Unlikely heroes will rise, unexpected aid will arrive, yet all eyes turn to the river, to the rising waters that form their shared foe.

It’s about a flood, obviously. A flood that takes place in a land without modern conveniences like trucks full of sandbags, but that’s what makes it fun!

As always, you can pick up all my Otherworld stories on my Patreon for the low, low price of $3/month. Keep watching for Part 4, What We Leave Behind, coming in June. Until then, keep reading!

🖼🗣: the emoji conlang, part 6

It’s time for some more 🖼🗣. Last time around, you may remember that we looked at the vast collection of emoji in the Unicode standard (as of version 12). Most of them, not counting the numerous variations allowed by gender, skin tone, and hair modifiers, have some sort of meaning in our script.

Now it’s time to put them to use in making not just words, but phrases, sentences. We’ve been doing that already, of course; parts 2 and 3 were dedicated to that. Here, though, we’ll delve deeper into the nuances. And we’ll take it one step at a time.

Noun phrases

Conveniently enough, most words in 🖼🗣 are nouns, so we’ve got a lot to work with here. (Since emoji are icons, and it’s a little difficult to have an icon that represents something abstract, it’s only natural.)

To start off, remember that our script doesn’t have articles. There’s no “a” or “the” in 🖼🗣. They’re not needed. (Plenty of languages around the world get by without them, after all.) The meaning is implied; if you really need to specify something definite, then the demonstrative pronoun 👇 can provide a similar function. It’s not exactly the same, as it actually means something closer to “this” than “the”, but you get the idea.

Numerals are another important part of noun phrases. For us, they’re pretty simple: just use them. For “one”, you write 1. Ordinals, as we saw last time, instead use the “keycap” emoji such as 1️⃣. For ordinals greater than 10, you can compound them: “fourteenth” (the day I’m writing this) is 14.

Everything else is fairly straightforward. Adjectives occur before their head nouns: ⬜ 👨 “a big man”; 🔵 🚗 “the blue car”. Possessives use the apostrophe notation we saw in Part 2, always attaching to the head noun: 3 🤳’🧒 “my three children”; 👇 👴 🤲’🏠 “this old house of ours”. The last traditional component of a noun phrase is a relative clause, which we’ll deal with later.

Before we move on, though, a couple of little extra rules. First, adjectives can’t appear as subjects without a head noun. (They’re fine as predicates, by the way.) Thus, you can use the determiner word ⚪ as a kind of “empty” noun in these cases: 2️⃣ ⚪ “the second one”. This is not the same as converting an adjective to a noun; that’s why ⚪ is a separate word here.

Second, you’re allowed to use a verb as a head noun in a very specific circumstance. Linguists call it an action nominal, but you can think of it as something like the English gerund phrase. It must be as part of a possession construction: 🤳’📖 “my reading”; ♂’🛑 🚗 “his stopping (of) the car”. Somewhat obscure, I’ll admit, but it might come in handy.

Verb phrases

Verbs have quite a bit of variance, as we saw in Part 3. But that’s all inflection. At the phrase level there’s not a lot to them. 🖼🗣 doesn’t do much in terms of verbal grammar, because we’re trying to keep things simple.

That said, we do have a handful of auxiliary verbal words. 🙆 and 🙅 indicate permission and prohibition, respectively; they’re equivalent to English may and may not: 💮 🙅 🛫 “you may not go”. Much to the dismay of students, there’s a different can counterpart, ❔➡. That one is only for ability.

Simple negation uses 🚫, so we might say 👁️‍🗨 🚫 🍴⏯ “I haven’t eaten”.

The imperative is what linguists call direct commands, and we mark it with the suffix ❕, as in 🛑❕ “stop!” Using the appropriate pronouns, we can do a few more tricks with this: 🤲 🛫❕ “let’s go”, 👥 👀❕ “let them see”.

The special compound pronoun 👐↔ means roughly “each other” when used as the object to a verb. We might use it like this: 👨 ➕ 👩 💕➡ 👐↔ “the man and woman love each other”.

Finally, you may be wondering where all the adverbs are. Well, 🖼🗣 doesn’t have a separate class of them. Instead, it just uses adjectives that modify verbs. That’s pretty much what a lot of English speakers do in colloquial language, so it shouldn’t be any problem. ✔ ✍❕ ◻ “write it correctly”, ♀ 👍 🗣 “she speaks well”.

Prepositions

Now we’re only missing one major part of language, and that’s the preposition. Grammatically speaking, those in 🖼🗣 function as adjectives, with the special rule that they always appear at the beginning of a noun phrase; this phrase can then appear after another one or at the end of the sentence, depending on the situation. (It’s not quite free variation, in case you’re wondering. Sentence-final phrases tend to be those that modify a verb.)

Here are some of the most common single-symbol prepositions in our script:

  • ⏩ – “after”
  • 🆚 – “against”
  • ⏪ – “before”
  • ➗ – “between”
  • ⤵ – “in” or “into”
  • ⤴ – “out of”

A lot more are compounds, often using the adjectival suffix 〰:

  • ⬆〰 – “above”
  • ⬇〰 – “below”
  • ⬅⬅ – “from”
  • ➡➡ – “to” or “for”
  • ➕↗ – “with”

Last, and simplest, is the way 🖼🗣 says at: @. You can use this as a normal preposition: 🤳 👉 @ 🎦 “I’m at the theater”. But it also has a secondary use as a kind of attention-getter for speech, in which case it works as a prefix on a head noun: 🤳 💬◀ @♂… “I said to him…” (The intent here is to emulate @-mentions, as on Twitter and Mastodon.)

To be continued

This post covered the most basic sorts of phrases you’ll find in 🖼🗣, but not the only ones. In the next installment, we’ll look into the more complex clauses: relative, purposive, subordinate, and so on. Sounds hard, I know, but never fear. There’s really not that much to them.

Amazon release: The Beast Within (Endless Forms 2)

Has it been a year already? Time for another Amazon release.

Fame is fleeting, but fear lives on forever.

The monsters are real. Cam Weir knows this. He’s seen them in the flesh, in all their naked, hideous glory. Yet he remains skeptical. Perhaps two monsters were enough for one man, for one life. Surely all those other things people see, those shadows lurking in the night, were merely products of overactive imaginations.

In most cases, they are nothing more, but not every call Cam receives can be so easily explained as a hoax. As he struggles to come to terms with his new status as a celebrity, a famous hunter of the paranormal, Cam finds that the world is strange, and it’s only becoming stranger. Now, in addition to Bigfoot, he must hunt a werewolf.

If you’re interested, head on over to the book’s page, where you can find a link to the Kindle Store for the digital edition, or the paperback for those who, like me, prefer the real thing. As always, be sure to check my Patreon for more info on how you can support me.

Release: Fortress of Steel, part 1 (Modern Minds 4)

It’s time for a new Modern Minds short story. This time around, it’s Part 1 of “Fortress of Steel”. As always, we’ll start with the blurb:

Dirk is a young man looking for his future. His mind holds a secret strength, a defense few can understand, let alone break. Yet that very power will lead him further into the hidden world he has only just glimpsed, a world of mystery, wonder, and danger.

Head on over to my Patreon (at least until it gets shut down!) to pick this one up. All you need is to subscribe at my Serious Reader level, which only costs you $3/month. That’s not much at all. And you’ll get the conclusion of this one when it comes out in August.

To share or not to share

Comic books have a long history of being set in a “shared” universe, and that has, in recent years, bled over into the movies and TV series made from them. Witness Marvel’s numerous offerings, how they all interconnect. Characters cross over, as can villains and plotlines. Major story events can reverberate through half a dozen individual series. (DC tried this, too, but they can’t seem to get it right the way their biggest rival does.)

In the world of “real” books, this kind of thing is not too common. That doesn’t mean it’s unknown, however. And there are a couple of ways to go about it. One might say that the Dune setting, for example, is a shared universe, as it has multiple authors working in the same world, under the same general constraints of style, characterization, and overall feel. The (now-defunct) Star Wars Expanded Universe is another good example: dozens of books, all able to build off one another, but still able to tell individual, independent stories.

The other option is a single-author universe. In this case, the meta-setting isn’t shared by multiple writers, but by multiple series. For this, the best example has to be Stephen King; The Dark Tower was his way of connecting all these disparate stories. Another example of an author placing lots of stories into the same universe is Brandon Sanderson, with his “Cosmere” setting. Again, the general principle is the same: multiple stories, all acting independent, but with signs that they are, in fact, set in the same world. (Or worlds, in this case.)

Even considering something like this is a massive undertaking, but…that’s just what I’ve been doing lately. And I’m fast coming to the conclusion that I’ve already started creating a shared universe for some of my works.

Let’s start with Otherworld, since it’s my biggest work yet. All along, I did intend it to be a place that could be shared. There’s a lot of worldbuilding and backstory that has absolutely no bearing on the main plot of the lost expedition. In fact, I’ve gone so far as to create a language for a race that won’t even show up in any of the planned 50 novellas and short novels that make up the “primary” Otherworld series. But that’s okay. In my mind, that gives me more room to try other stories. And I don’t even mind others trying their hand at something set in the universe. (Seriously. Just ask, and I’ll tell you all you need to know.)

One series does not a universe make, of course, but that’s where it starts getting bigger. My Endless Forms series of paranormal thrillers will soon see its second full release (next month in paperback and ebook formats), and I have slipped in a vague reference to one of the Otherworld “bridge” stories, specifically “The Control Variable”. It’s not overt, and it could easily be explained away as a chance coincidence, but I know the truth. And I know I should probably regret it. Now that I’m writing the third entry in Endless Forms, Change of Heart, I may end up adding more nods to Otherworld.

So that’s two, but not all. In November 2017 I wrote The Soulstone Sorcerer, the first entry in a series I’ve codenamed Gateway. The timing doesn’t work for it to reference either of the two above—it’s set in 2018, the others after—but I have gone the other way. The Second Crossing and Point of Origin, two of the 2nd season Otherworld novels you’ll see this year, both have oblique references to The Soulstone Sorcerer. Again, it’s not so obvious that you can’t miss it. No, this is nothing more than a mention. But it may grow into something more.

Shared universes don’t have to be connected through direct links like this, though. Thus, if I’m going to be doing this, then I have no problem saying that, for instance, Heirs of Divinity is set in the same world. There’s about 300 years of difference between it and any of the others, but it concerns essentially the same idea as Otherworld, Endless Forms, and Gateway: things on this planet are not as they seem.

That one’s a decision for later. The same could be said for “Fallen”, the novella I released for free last year. And “Miracles”, since it’s a direct spin-off of Heirs. Some others I have on my to-do list might also end up being in this shared setting, but we’ll see.

Obviously, not everything I write can fit this mold. Nocturne and The Linear Cycle quite obviously aren’t set on our planet. They’re fantasy stories in fantasy worlds. Orphans of the Stars is meant to be “harder”, so it’s out, too. The same goes for Before I Wake, although I may have made it a book that exists in the shared setting.

Hidden Hills is a tough one, though. On its face, it fits the fantasy theme the same as Nocturne. If you look at it the right way, however, it might actually be a far-future sequel to Orphans of the Stars. Okay, maybe I wouldn’t go that far, but if you read the two, you can see how they could, in theory, be connected.

In other words, even the notion of a shared setting can lead to false friends, stories that look like they’re linked, but really aren’t. Also, I have to resist the temptation of drawing stories closer together when they’re meant to remain separate. I’m not ready for crossovers. I don’t think they’d fit my writing style at all, and they feel a little too…campy for my tastes.

Still, it’s something to think about.

🖼🗣: the emoji conlang, part 5

As promised, this edition of our series on the emoji conlang 🖼🗣 (aka Pictalk), is going to be focused primarily on building our vocabulary. You saw last time the ways we can combine symbols to create new words, but we’re first going to look at roots, individual symbols that can be used as words in their own right.

The inventory

As of the recently-released Version 12 of the Unicode standard, we have a total of 3,019 emoji at our disposal. That sounds like a lot, for sure, but…it’s not that simple, at least as far as our script is concerned. Gender and skin tone modifiers don’t come into play for us, because their meanings aren’t exactly lexical. (Okay, gender is linguistic, but I’ve decided that it plays no role in 🖼🗣 grammar.) Take those out, take out the various “family” permutations, and do some shuffling, and my best calculation is a total of 1,581.

That’s still a large number, but we’re using quite a lot of them, such as ◻ or ➡, as grammatical particles, suffixes, or other “content-less” morphemes. Also, we’ve got plenty of duplicates, and some, such as the annoying “cat face” emoji, that we just don’t use. What’s left comes out to 1,200 or so symbols, plenty for a vast and diverse vocabulary even before you start compounding.

The roots

We can divide the roots into a number of categories. We’ll look at each of those groups in turn, because they tend to show some similarities. While I won’t describe every emoji in much detail, I hope this overview, along with the examples I give, suffice until I can create a real list.

Faces

Most of the faces (the emoticons, as we old-timers call them) stand for the emotion or state they express:

  • 😄 – happy
  • 😕 – confused
  • 😠 – angry
  • 😫 – tired
  • 😷 – sick

Not all are like this, though. The “basic” face 😀 instead translates as the noun face itself. 😆, 🙃, and 😤 represent verbs laugh, invert, and defeat, respectively. But symbols like these are the exception, and the class-changing suffixes we saw last time work to convert them into something more like their fellows.

Emotions

Unicode is for lovers, apparently, because there’s an awful lot of different hearts. But we’ve got other emotions, too. And most of the hearts turn out to be just color variations; in 🖼🗣, colored version of emoji always represent those colors.

The rest tend to be either adjectives describing the emotion or verbs that define an action, although some get more idiosyncratic meanings instead:

  • 💋 – to kiss
  • 💌 – romance
  • 💖 – emotional
  • ❣ – to compliment
  • 💨 – fast
  • 💤 – sleep (note that this is a noun first)

The standard includes a few others in the “emotion” section, namely speech bubbles. These are important as communication words in our script:

  • 💬 – to say
  • 👁️‍🗨 – the 1st-person pronoun “I” (where needed)
  • 🗨 – to reply
  • 🗯 – to shout
  • 💭 – to think
Body parts

Mostly, body part emoji stand for the that part of the body, or else the sense it provides:

  • 🧠 – intelligence
  • 👂 – ear
  • 🦴 – bone (this is new, so not all fonts support it)
  • 👁 – eye
  • 👀 – to see
  • 👄 – mouth

The various finger-pointing symbols, by contrast, have meanings less often associated with symbolism:

  • 👋 – hello
  • 🖐 – fingers
  • 🎌 – to hope
  • 👉 – to be
  • 👈 – a marker for relative clauses (which we’ll see in a future post)
  • 👆 – that
  • 👇 – this
  • 👍 – good
  • 👎 – bad
  • 🙏 – to pray
  • 🤲 – the 1st-person pronoun “we”

And I think you can guess what 🖕 means.

People

As stated above, 🖼🗣 doesn’t bother with the gender or skin tone modifiers of Unicode. Instead, people are just…people. With very few exceptions, the “person” emoji stand for the specific person represented:

  • 👨 – man
  • 👩 – woman
  • 👶 – baby
  • 🧒 – child
  • 👨‍🎓 or 👩‍🎓 – student
  • 👨‍🎤 or 👩‍🎤 – singer

Some of the exceptions include 🙍, for the verb frown, and 🙅, to indicate prohibition (“may not”, in English).

Also, any of the numerous family permutations is allowed as a substitute for 👪 family. The generic is considered the default, but more specific variants can show a degree of politeness or respect.

Activities

Technically, Unicode classes these as a subset of the “person” group, but they’re very different in our script. For most of these, the meaning is verbal, rather than nominal. Again, gender doesn’t matter, although it can be considered polite to use it where it matters. (Where available, the generic “person” forms are to be preferred as default.)

  • 🚶 – to walk
  • 🏌 – to play golf
  • 🏊 – to swim
  • 🛀 – to wash/bathe
  • 🛌 – to rest
Animals

Unicode has a bunch of animal emoji symbols, and we use almost all of them to represent those animals by themselves. Reduplicated forms (doubling the symbol) form a “pack”, “flock”, or any other collective noun, while the adjective and verb class-changing suffixes form words concerning the nature and actions of each individual animal.

  • 🐕 – dog
  • 🐈 – cat
  • 🐴 – horse
  • 🐁 – mouse
  • 🐔 – chicken
  • 🐳 – whale
  • 🐜 – ant

One of the few exceptions in this class is 🐽, which instead stands for the verb smell.

Plants

Plants aren’t as numerous as animals in the Unicode emoji set, and 🖼🗣 tends to use many of them for more abstract meanings. Still, the specific types of plant, such as 🌷 and 🌵, stand for their individual kinds.

Examples of the abstract set include:

  • 🌱 – plant
  • 🍀 – luck
  • 🍂 – autumn
Food and drink

People love to eat, and Unicode definitely has them covered there. As with plants and animals, most of these are specific foods or beverages, so their basic meanings encode those:

  • 🍔 – hamburger
  • 🍕 – pizza
  • 🍓 – strawberry
  • 🍪 – cookie
  • 🍺 – beer

A couple of abstract symbols include:

  • 🍳 – to cook (specifically fry, but any kind of cooking is a valid translation)
  • 🥘 – food

Also, the 🍴 and 🍽 symbols translate as eat and meal, respectively.

Places

Once more, we have a large set of emoji symbols whose meanings are fairly transparent. The numerous places, whether geographic or constructed, tend to represent in language what they look like:

  • ⛰ – mountain
  • 🏠 – house
  • 🏥 – hospital
  • 🏫 – school
Transportation

Unicode gives us a lot of vehicles, and we use them about how you’d expect. I know this is sounding like a tired refrain by now, but it’s just how it is.

  • 🚕 – taxi
  • 🚓 – police
  • 🚃 – train

A little wrinkle here is that 🛣 is the abstract road rather than something more specific; if you want something more concrete (sorry about the pun), you can use compounding.

Clocks

Clocks representing half-hour intervals should be self-explanatory. The ⌛ emoji represents time in the abstract, while the verb measure (specifically for time) can be translated as ⏱.

Sky and weather

Most of these are fairly obvious. Cloudy and sunny skies represent just that. The various kinds of weather emoji mostly encode that sort of state. 💧 is abstract water, however, and 🌊 is ocean rather than something specifically to do with waves.

Recreation

Games, sports, and activities mostly function the same as any other “this is what it looks like” emoji:

  • ⚾ – baseball
  • ⛷ – to ski

Some are different, though: 🕹 is control, 🃏 simply joke.

Clothing

Once more, it’s the same general idea: 👕 is shirt, etc. Some of the oddities here include:

  • 🎓 – to graduate
  • 🛍 – to shop
  • 🎒 – student
Technology

Many of the technology-oriented emoji are used for grammatical purposes. Most of the rest tend to be of the “object” sort we’ve seen so many times already:

  • 💿 – CD
  • 🎥 – film
  • 📸 – to take a picture
Tools

Most of the tools are of the “object” sort, representing the objects they appear to be. An important exception is 🔫, which always translates as a real gun, not a toy, when used alone. (Unicode quite clearly defines the symbol as “pistol”, but PC-crazed tech companies try to pass it off as a harmless water gun instead.)

A few other interesting symbols in this group include:

  • ⚖ – law
  • ⚙ – machine
  • 🗜 – to compress
  • ⛓ – to hold back
Household

These are more “object” type emoji, and they tend to fall under the same rules as above.

Keycaps

I’m skipping most of the symbols in this post for a very good reason: they’re symbolic. They don’t have well-defined meanings to begin with, so I felt no shame in recycling them for grammatical use. That includes things like audio controls, punctuation, and the multitude of arrows.

But one set of exceptions should be pointed out here, I think. The Unicode standard has a kind of generic method of constructing keycaps (boxed numerals that look like they’re on buttons), and it defines about a dozen of them. The numerical ones, such as 1, are ordinals: first, second, etc. The others are:

  • #️⃣ – number
  • *️⃣ – any
Flags

Lastly, about 300 of the available emoji are national or regional flags. These are a little special in 🖼🗣, for they can function as both nouns and adjectives without needing class-changing suffixes. The role they fill is implied based on position, defaulting to nominal:

  • 🇺🇸 – USA, American
  • 🇪🇺 – Europe, European
  • 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 – England, English (note: not the same as 🇬🇧)

Conclusion

Whew. That’s a lot to take in, and I didn’t even cover everything. Fortunately, it’s a lot smoother sailing from here on out. I’ll illustrate new words when they come up, and I’ll point out non-obvious compounds or derivations. Other than that, the next post will get back to grammar. Fun, isn’t it?

Release: Alignment Adjustment (Return to the Otherworld 2)

And here we go again. Return to the Otherworld continues with its second installment, Alignment Adjustment.

Things have changed.

The other world isn’t the same, nor are those whose lives have been touched by it. To truly understand how best to live in this new land, those who came from another must accept that first impressions are not everything. Only by recognizing their mistakes will they have the chance to avoid them in the future.

For the second expedition, readjustment is a necessity. Now that they have begun to dive deeper into the cultural waters of this world, they can no longer deny their place in it. Some may not like that place. Some may struggle with the preconceived notions of their new neighbors, their friends and lovers. But even that forces them into the mold they so desperately wish to escape.

Not a lot happens in this one, I’ll admit. It’s more getting things set up, moving people around, and a lot of character interaction. The expedition was gone for nearly a year, after all. It’ll take time to get back in the saddle.

As ever, Otherworld stories are Patreon exclusives for the time being. That means you can head on over to my Patreon and pick up Alignment Adjustment for a pledge of $3/month. And the list of things you can get for that low price keeps on growing.

Coming up next is Part 3 of the series, Waters Rising. Look for it soon, and remember to keep reading!